Sample Sidebar Module

This is a sample module published to the sidebar_top position, using the -sidebar module class suffix. There is also a sidebar_bottom position below the menu.

Sample Sidebar Module

This is a sample module published to the sidebar_bottom position, using the -sidebar module class suffix. There is also a sidebar_top position below the search.

Volvo Trucks North America continues to provide customers with exceptional uptime support amid the current COVID-19 situation. As always, Volvo Action Service (VAS) is enabling customers to connect with highly trained uptime experts for 24/7 assistance to quickly manage service, connectivity solutions, schedule repairs and tackle any other issues they experience amid the pandemic to ensure maximized uptime. 

 “With COVID-19, it’s more important than ever for trucks to remain on the road, delivering much-needed goods and supplies,” said Conal Deedy, Director of Customer Productivity Solutions, Volvo Trucks North America. “During this time, we are committed to offering the same all-day and all-night uptime support for our customers despite modified working conditions. Our Volvo Action Service team is made up of real people, all employees of Volvo Trucks, who offer fast solutions for customers so they can focus on delivering food, medicine and other essential materials needed right now, safely and efficiently.”

VAS employees at Volvo Trucks’ Uptime Center in Greensboro, NC, actively prepared for possible work-from-home scenarios well in advance of the COVID-19 crisis, enabling an extremely smooth and fast transition of its skilled employees working remotely without any disruptions to customers and dealers. And since the transition happened so seamlessly, the teams were able to adjust to the new working scenario quickly, keeping the implementation of continuous improvement projects and initiatives going, even under these rapidly evolving circumstances.

Through these initiatives and process changes, Volvo Action Service will continue to decrease on-hold times and increase the overall service level for customers.

Additionally, remote services are especially important now amidst the COVID-19 social distancing mandates. Volvo Trucks’ over-the-air services and Remote Programming capabilities increase uptime as updates can be done in a matter of minutes without having to visit a dealership. Remote Diagnostics, which is standard in every Volvo truck, also helps avoid unexpected downtime by monitoring Volvo engines, I-Shift transmissions and after-treatment systems.

“Over the past few weeks, we have been able to deliver the same best-in-class customer service to our customers and dealers via the Volvo Action Service team, quickly resolving issues and offering support, all while abiding by the restrictions set forth due to the COVID-19 situation. The dedication of the Uptime team to supporting customers during this difficult time is inspiring,” said Deedy.

Volvo Action Service is included at no extra charge for two years with the purchase of every Volvo truck.

Volvo Trucks provides complete transport solutions for professional and demanding customers, offering a full range of medium to heavy duty trucks. Customer support is secured via a global network of dealers with 2,100 service points in more than 130 countries. Volvo trucks are assembled in 14 countries across the globe. In 2019, approximately 131,000 Volvo trucks were delivered worldwide. Volvo Trucks is part of Volvo Group, one of the world’s leading manufacturers of trucks, buses, construction equipment and marine and industrial engines. The Group also provides complete solutions for financing and service. Volvo Trucks’s work is based on the core values of quality, safety and environmental care. For further information, please contact Jennifer Edwards, Volvo Trucks, phone 336-392-9396 or email jennifer.edwards@volvo.com.

Current News

Retention for the Future of Trucking

As we look ahead, we recognize that retention is a critical component of the trucking sector’s business model and success in retaining a strong workforce. At a point where we have a skilled worker shortage, we cannot afford to lose our assets: our driving force who keep the economy moving and our businesses growing.

We have companies with varied turnover rates and those rates result in dollars lost. We have companies that have varied hiring practices, which inevitably result in varied retention rates.

The reports indicate that the skilled worker shortage will continue to increase as we move toward 2024. It’s time to reinforce our retention practices so we can reduce our turnover rates – resulting in strong retention practices.

It is a topic worth considering. We need to put the same level of effort into retention as we do into recruitment. Why is retention a challenge? What areas are we missing that create this barrier to stronger retention rates? Do we accept high turnover as the cost of doing business?

Let’s take a step back. The loss of one driver can have a potential cost implication of up to $5,000 (this may be low for some companies) to replace the professional driver. Lose 10 drivers and suddenly you are at a loss of approximately $50,000. In a sector where margins are tight, can we afford those types of losses without exploring why and how we can do better?

Understanding why we lose people in our sector can be challenging. Even the best exit survey strategies do not always yield the information we need to remove barriers and retain the individual or offer insight into what we can do differently; however, the survey is an essential tool that provides an opportunity to learn... it just needs to go beyond the surface. We need to go to the beginning at the point of hire.

The first thing I think about when looking at retention is trust. Is there trust being built at the recruitment stage – at a level that can be delivered beyond the promises made at the point of recruitment. Can we deliver the pay, home time, benefits, flexibility and everything else that we have promised?

Trust is a deal-breaker for many of us. If you promise professional development in the first year of an employee’s career and then do not offer it, you have broken trust. If you promise a raise after a three-month probation period and do not provide it, you have broken trust. If you promise a professional driver that they will be able to be home for special occasions and you do not get them home, you have broken trust.

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