Sample Sidebar Module

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Sample Sidebar Module

This is a sample module published to the sidebar_bottom position, using the -sidebar module class suffix. There is also a sidebar_top position below the search.

The Infrastructure Health and Safety Association (IHSA) in partnership with the Ontario Ministry of Labour has developed a series of free COVID-19 guidelines for the transportation, construction, and utilities sectors, as essential services and industries in Ontario.

The guidance for the transportation sector stresses the importance of practicing physical distancing, ensuring good hygiene like proper hand washing, not sharing items like communications devices, pens, and personal protective equipment, and staying home if feeling ill.

Some additional general best practices include:

• Minimizing the number of vehicles shared by employees where possible to limit the spread of the virus.

• Ensuring drivers have access to appropriate disinfectants, hand sanitizer, personal protective equipment, and other materials needed to clean high-touch surfaces in their vehicles frequently.

• Reducing face-to-face contact as much as possible, and staying in the cab or designated waiting space while loads are handled or during inspections.

• Eating healthy and getting enough rest and exercise to maintain good physical and mental health.

Additional precautions specific to drivers stopping at rest stops and taking breaks have also been included.

Wearing PPE, such as gloves, while refuelling and the use of disinfectant wipes to clean the pump handles and key pads. Packing snacks, just in case regular stops are closed, and avoiding the use of refillable mugs are other recommendations included to help reduce the transmission of the virus.

To support all areas of the transportation industry the IHSA also created job specific guideline documents for shippers and receivers, cleaning and sanitizing vehicles, handling paperwork, as well as mental health and fatigue management.

The health and safety of workers is a top concern amid the global COVID-19 pandemic. During this time, all parties must place an increased focus on health and safety in order to keep transportation companies operating as an essential service to our country’s economy and continuity of operations.

For more information, contact roadsafety@ihsa.ca.

Current News

How Ontario’s General Trucking Sector can Address Driver Fatigue Among Professional Drivers

Driver fatigue identified as a top health and safety risk for trucking operations in Ontario

Top 10 root causes of driver fatigue among professional truck drivers in Ontario

In February 2020, Ontario’s Ministry of Labour, Training and Skills Development (MLTSD) in partnership with the Infrastructure Health and Safety Association (IHSA) organized a group of industry experts that met for two days to determine the root causes of driver fatigue in Ontario’s trucking sector. As part of their work, they also developed critical controls and specific activities that could be put in place to address driver fatigue in Ontario’s general trucking industry.

The list of the top 10 causes of driver fatigue, as identified by workers, supervisors, and employers in Ontario’s trucking sector is displayed in the infographic on pages 34-35 of Private Motor Carrier. More detailed information on the top causes of driver fatigue among professional truck drivers, is discussed in the accompanying technical paper available at www.ihsa.ca/driverfatigue.

Identifying solutions and controls

After identifying the top 10 causal factors of driver fatigue, the group of subject matter experts, led by Dr. Sujoy Dey of the MLTSD, identified possible solutions and controls for the top ranked risks. During the discussions, similar themes and proposed controls kept emerging that informed five key recommendations:

  • classify truck driving as a skilled trade (Red Seal),
  • review and address critical training gaps in mandatory entry-level training (MELT),
  • mandatory graduated licensing for all truck drivers,
  • greater enforcement of carriers who are non-compliant with the Occupational Health and Safety Act (OHSA) and the Highway Traffic Act, and
  • promote mental health and wellness among professional truck drivers.

These recommendations provide a foundation for the reduction in driver fatigue by focussing on systemic causal factors and not just the symptoms of driver fatigue. The trucking industry should focus immediately on addressing these five key recommendations.

“The group of industry experts shared their experience, made suggestions, and proposed potential controls to address the primary causal factors and identified systemic weaknesses in the industry,” says Michelle Roberts, IHSA Director, Stakeholder & Client Engagement. “IHSA is proud of our work as an advocate for improving professional truck driver training, non-compliant carrier enforcement, and the importance of driver mental health and wellness. This work is a strong first step toward meaningful changes for safer and healthier workplaces for professional truck drivers.”

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