Sample Sidebar Module

This is a sample module published to the sidebar_top position, using the -sidebar module class suffix. There is also a sidebar_bottom position below the menu.

Sample Sidebar Module

This is a sample module published to the sidebar_bottom position, using the -sidebar module class suffix. There is also a sidebar_top position below the search.

Trucking HR Canada released the second report in a series focused on assessing labour market impacts of COVID-19. This report includes updated insights of how COVID-19 is affecting trucking and logistics employment, and what can be expected for employers in the industry in the next three years. This second stage of the report presents a labour market forecast and shares results based on the ramifications of COVID-19. In the forecast, we learn that:

  • Over the first two quarters of 2020, employment in the trucking and logistics sector is expected to contract by 10.4%, or 72,000 jobs, due to COVID-19. We expect a 10.9% contraction among truck drivers and 10.0% decline among non-truck driver occupations.
  • Given anticipated retirements and other labour outflows from the truck driver occupation, there is a strong indication that, by 2023, labour demand is unlikely to be fully met, which would mean a return to driver shortages.
  • We estimate that COVID-19 and its economy-wide impacts will result in declines in truck driver employment that cost the truck transportation industry approximately $3.2 billion in sales in 2020.

On July 9, the Government of Canada held a briefing to share this important update with officials and ultimately aid in good decision making for the industry. Trucking HR Canada partnered with The Conference Board of Canada to undertake research assessing the labour impacts of Covid-19 on the trucking and logistics sector. This forecast is designed to help us better understand what employers might expect down the road in terms of post-COVID economic rebound projections, forecasts of employment as well as estimates on expected employment losses.

You can download the report at truckinghr.com.

Trucking HR Canada is a national, non-profit organization, advancing modern HR solutions for the trucking and logistics workforce. We collaborate, partner, and work with a dynamic network including industry associations, government departments and industry professionals to ensure Canada’s freight transportation network has the skilled workforce needed for today and into the future.

Current News

How Ontario’s General Trucking Sector can Address Driver Fatigue Among Professional Drivers

Driver fatigue identified as a top health and safety risk for trucking operations in Ontario

Top 10 root causes of driver fatigue among professional truck drivers in Ontario

In February 2020, Ontario’s Ministry of Labour, Training and Skills Development (MLTSD) in partnership with the Infrastructure Health and Safety Association (IHSA) organized a group of industry experts that met for two days to determine the root causes of driver fatigue in Ontario’s trucking sector. As part of their work, they also developed critical controls and specific activities that could be put in place to address driver fatigue in Ontario’s general trucking industry.

The list of the top 10 causes of driver fatigue, as identified by workers, supervisors, and employers in Ontario’s trucking sector is displayed in the infographic on pages 34-35 of Private Motor Carrier. More detailed information on the top causes of driver fatigue among professional truck drivers, is discussed in the accompanying technical paper available at www.ihsa.ca/driverfatigue.

Identifying solutions and controls

After identifying the top 10 causal factors of driver fatigue, the group of subject matter experts, led by Dr. Sujoy Dey of the MLTSD, identified possible solutions and controls for the top ranked risks. During the discussions, similar themes and proposed controls kept emerging that informed five key recommendations:

  • classify truck driving as a skilled trade (Red Seal),
  • review and address critical training gaps in mandatory entry-level training (MELT),
  • mandatory graduated licensing for all truck drivers,
  • greater enforcement of carriers who are non-compliant with the Occupational Health and Safety Act (OHSA) and the Highway Traffic Act, and
  • promote mental health and wellness among professional truck drivers.

These recommendations provide a foundation for the reduction in driver fatigue by focussing on systemic causal factors and not just the symptoms of driver fatigue. The trucking industry should focus immediately on addressing these five key recommendations.

“The group of industry experts shared their experience, made suggestions, and proposed potential controls to address the primary causal factors and identified systemic weaknesses in the industry,” says Michelle Roberts, IHSA Director, Stakeholder & Client Engagement. “IHSA is proud of our work as an advocate for improving professional truck driver training, non-compliant carrier enforcement, and the importance of driver mental health and wellness. This work is a strong first step toward meaningful changes for safer and healthier workplaces for professional truck drivers.”

Read more ...